Additional Digital Resources

Digital Projects on Historical Disasters in Japan

 

Minna de honkoku みんなで翻刻:地震史料  (In Japanese)

A collection of archived historical earthquake documents that have been crowdsourced and transcribed for greater accessibility to the public.  The project is sponsored by Kyoto University with the aid of various seismologists and historians in the hope that these records will not only aid in our understanding of past disasters, but may also play a role in the prevention of future ones.

 

Imaging Kantō:  Mapping Japan’s 1923 Great Earthquake through Visual Culture

A digital complement to Gennifer Weisenfeld’s monograph, Imaging Disaster: Tokyo and the Visual Culture of Japan’s Great Earthquake of 1923.  A collection of postcards by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University serves as the core of the catalog.

 

Teach 3.11 (English, 日本語, and more)

Teach 3.11 is a multi-language collaborative project that helps teachers, students, and scholars locate and share educational resources about the historical contexts of scientific and technical issues related to understanding large-scale disasters, such as the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters in Japan.

 

Great Kantō Earthquake Japan – September 1923

Contains 199 images, which were scanned from black and white photos at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.  The images are possibly supplemental materials to the publication: The Great Earthquake of September 1st, 1923: a record from the reports of the “Japan Chronicle” of the destruction of Yokohama and Tokyo and the other ravages wrought.  Kobe Japan Chronicle Office.

 

Kanto daishinsai o shiraberu <関東大震災>を調べる (In Japanese)

Includes materials held by the Yokohama City Library on the Kanto Earthquake

 

National Science Museum of Earthquake Materials (In Japanese)

Contains photographs of numerous earthquakes and volcanic eruptions between 1888-1927

 

The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923: Materials from the Dana and Vera Reynolds Collection

The collection by Brown University Library Center for Digital Scholarship serves as not only documentation of the Great Kanto Earthquake, but also offers a unique glimpse into the culture of Americans traveling to Asia in the early 20th Century. It includes newspapers clippings, photographs, telegrams, postcards, and various other travel keepsakes